How Simple Phrases Can Build Trust



When you use phrases like “That’s not my job”, or “I don’t know”, Jonathan says that diminishes your authority with your customers.  Instead, he suggest elevating your authority by using these phrases.


One of the psychological influencers that’s impacting your customers in the process is a influencer known as, “Higher authority.” It has to do with whether or not they see you as an expert or someone they can trust. Oftentimes I hear salespeople diminishing their authorities with their clients by saying things like, “I don’t know. That’s not my job. That’s not my area. I’m not the one who handles that.” All these phrases diminish your authority with your client.

Instead, consider elevating your position of authority by using different phrases like, “I’m the one that can help you with that. I’m happy to do that for you. That’s my area of expertise.” Or, “I’m the right person.” By elevating your authority with your clients, you build trust. We all know customers do business with people they know, like, and trust. So, elevate your authority. Don’t diminish it.

I’m Johnathan Dawson. Thanks for joining me for today’s Sales Tip of the Day.

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  1. Okay, but let’s play devil’s advocate here. If someone asks for something that is out of your authority, and not your job, and even if you are willing to do it, but cannot do it yourself, wouldn’t it be smarter to let your customer know that that s the case? Otherwise, fumbling around trying to complete their request, wasting time, could make the guest more irritated, especially if something doesn’t go as planned.

    Especially from a customer standpoint, I would much rather hear; “My apologies, but I am unsure, however, let me find the right person for you to talk to about that subject!” than be blatantly lied to and have something go wrong or take too much time.


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