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Toyota introduces new 2024 Grand Highlander to its line of crossovers

With the new 2024 Grand Highlander, which includes two gas-powered hybrid options, Toyota is extending its segment-leading, three-row crossover lineup.

On Feb. 7, the company unveiled the car as the Toyota Highlander midsize SUV/larger crossover’s sibling. According to Toyota, it offers 13.2 cubic feet more cargo room and is wider and longer than the Highlander.

As buyers spend record amounts on new cars, the vehicle is the latest illustration of automakers’ attempts to go bigger and test their pricing power. With continued, but improving supply chain issues, the average cost of a new car to start this year was close to $50,000. This is because automakers favor high-end vehicles over entry-level ones.

The Grand Highlander’s price has not yet been disclosed by Toyota, but analysts anticipate it to be higher than that of comparable standard versions, which start at between $36,000 and $51,000. When it comes to dealerships this summer, it will be available in three trim levels.

The Ford Explorer, Chevrolet Traverse, and other well-known larger midsize SUVs/crossovers are among the vehicles that the Grand Highlander will compete against. Sales of these vehicles are expected to increase by 4% between 2018 and 2022 as Americans turn away from big sedans and other types of automobiles.

Nearly 223,000 Highlanders were sold last year, making it one of Toyota’s best-selling models. Only the Toyota Camry car and small crossover RAV4 outsold it in terms of sales. The Grand Highlander isn’t expected to be a high-volume product, but the firm claims it “rounds out” Toyota’s crossover lineup and gives buyers additional choices.

13 cupholders and seven USB-C charging ports will be distributed throughout the Grand Highlander’s three rows, according to Toyota, along with a number of active safety and convenience features.

Toyota intends to spend around $70 billion over the course of nine years on electrified vehicles, of which $35 billion will go toward all-electric battery solutions. By 2025, it hopes to have roughly 70 electrified vehicles available worldwide.

Ultimately, the largest manufacturer in the world, Toyota, intends to sell a third of its current annual sales by 2030, or approximately 3.5 million, of all EVs.


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Jaelyn Campbell
Jaelyn Campbell
Jaelyn Campbell is a staff writer/reporter for CBT News. She is a recent honors cum laude graduate with a BFA in Mass Media from Valdosta State University. Jaelyn is an enthusiastic creator with more than four years of experience in corporate communications, editing, broadcasting, and writing. Her articles in The Spectator, her hometown newspaper, changed how people perceive virtual reality. She connects her readers to the facts while providing them a voice to understand the challenges of being an entrepreneur in the digital world.

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